The Employee Engagement Network

Gallup has just released a major study which finds that successful engagement programs in organizations cascade down from an engaged executive committee and not from radiating middle managers or bubbling up from front-line employees.  http://gmj.gallup.com/content/144140/Leading-Engagement-Top.aspx

Tags: engagement, executives, impact

Views: 30

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Peter,

You are correct. The workforce engages because it is something that they see is beneficial to them. They must be accountable to becoming engaged. So on that point I agree wholeheartedly.

However, I must disagree that walking the talk compromises engagement. Your point about not trying to force someone down a path is a good one. But, in the beginning, it is important to for folks to see that their leaders are doing what is being asked of them. Although I am not as experienced as some, I have been doing this work for a number of years. In my experience I have never seen an organization sustain a high level of engagement that has definitive impact on its productivity and profitability without the senior leaders taking action on engagement. Now you are correct to say, that may mean they must stop doing something that is disengaging the workforce. But, just as the workforce must choose to be engaged, they must choose to not be disengaged. It is important for the senior team to be engaged because that sustains those high level benefits to the organization. At some point, the employees will not care what the senior team is doing. But, the senior team should. They are a team too.
The goals of senior management are going to be very broad. It is up to the front line managers to translate these goals into something meaningful for their lower level employees. Therefore any buy in from senior management is going to have a little eventual effect on the employees.

If senior management is very unfocused then frontline managers can provide focus by giving specific goals to individual employees, and therefore build engagement. And if senior management has very good ideas about employee engagement, front line managers can undermine this by ignoring their employees, or translating senior management intentions badly.
Therefore front line managers are the weak link in any engagement initiative.

RSS

580 Videos Related to Employee Engagement

Click on this eBook listing over 580 videos available on the network. When you open the document up online you can click on the title to go directly to the video. Happy and engaged viewing.

EEN Facebook Feed

The one question employee engagement survey: Why are you still here?

The one question employee engagement survey: Why are you still here?


The shortest Employee Engagement survey has one question | Leandro Herrero
leandroherrero.com
And the question is: ‘Why are you still here?’ You learn about the organization by asking questions to employees when they leave you (exit interviews) but you learn far more when you ask them why they are staying (‘stay’ interviews). It’s not a joke. ‘Why are you still here?’ – with the emphasis on…

Open employee engagement with your key moment http://conta.cc/1p8ny4U

Open employee engagement with your key moment http://conta.cc/1p8ny4U


Open employee engagement with your key moment
conta.cc
What is the key moment at work that has the biggest impact on engagement for you and others? Is it the start of the day? The end of the day? How you begin a mobile meeting? Dealing with a conflict or work overload? Find the key moment and determine what you can do to prevent that moment from turning…

Employee Engagement Definition: A focus on “with others” http://wp.me/p1An1o-4Dw

Employee Engagement Definition: A focus on “with others” http://wp.me/p1An1o-4Dw


Employee Engagement Definition: A focus on "with others"
www.davidzinger.com
Employee engagement is not a solo endeavor (Reading time 42 seconds) I loved reading Kate Nasser’s deeper look at my employee engagement definition of: “good work, done well, with others, every day.” Thank you Kate. She offered an… [ 117 more words. ]

© 2014   Created by David Zinger.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service