The Employee Engagement Network

How can we get employees to show up at work passionate, whole and energized?


Here is an article written by Jacqueline M. Walters for Talent Management magazine (January 2011). To check out other resources and sign up for a free online and/or print subscription to Talent Management and Chief Learning magazines published by MediaTec, please click here.

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The best practices to defuse disenchanted and disengaged employees in the workplace. Integrate a work/fun performance enhancement program. The use of excellent presentation skills to capture and hold employees attention. The powers of persuasion to stimulate super learning. To unleash passion, creativity and inspire motivation. An infusion of encouragement when needed. Incentive programs to reward employees. The result will be enhanced performance, fostered good morale, challenged and fulfilled, productively engaged employees.
 
The deepest craving of human nature is the need to feel value and valuable. Build two-way trust and winning relationships with employees based on acceptance, appreciation, approval, admiration and attention to reap the benefits of win/win relationships. Give employees the permission to perform. Allow them to bring the best of their whole selves to work every day. Welcome the whole employee to work, his/her ideas, interest and talents.
 
Encourage and be open to a work/fun environment. Fun does not necessarily happen on schedule, it grows within a culture that fosters its existence. Trust and promote a healthy balance work life environment, expand the workplace boundaries for employees to feel, confident and comfortable.
 
The organizations most valuable assets, is its employees. why not trust them to use their judgments to bring fun to their workplace, for a healthy balance work-life. Mentor/coach employees to over come fear and failure, and to embrace expansive thinking and risk-taking. Create time and space for conversation and discussion. Listen to and make each employee heard. Embrace employees to engender one successful journey after another that instills self-confidence, which leads to high levels of performance and productivity in all tasks.

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My own take:

1.  Most problems with “disenchanted and disengaged employees” can be avoided before they are hired during the recruiting and interviewing process.

2 Once hired, people who become “disenchanted and disengaged employees” probably have supervisors who are “disenchanted and disengaged.”

3. Highly-valued employees who leave do not quit companies; they quit bosses.

Question: Why don't all companies that lose highly-valued employees use the exit interview of them to identify those whom they consider to be the most highly-respected and (especially) least-respected supervisors?

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Jacqueline M. Walters is a consultant, business analyst, and executive coach at Hank Waterman Enterprise in the
Greater New York City Area. Previously, she was an international trader at Nationwide Export/Import Inc., and d a consultant/ business analyst at JACWAL. Her specific areas of expertise include organizational development and behavior, coaching, business forecasting, and supply chain management.


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Comment by Robert Morris on February 17, 2011 at 12:19pm
Scott: Thank you for sharing your thoughts. Her article was not intended to provide the scope and depth of discussion that the subject obviously requires. Why are more than 70% of employees in a US workplace (on average) either passively engaged or actively disengaged? Reasons vary from one workplace to another, of course, but my own opinion is that active and positive engagement begins and ends with supervisors,especially with residents of the C-suite. For better or worse, they set the example. "Training, resources, coaching, planning, goal setting, leadership" (i.e. "the hard business stuff") must focus on developing effective (i.e. competent and caring) supervisors. Best regards, Bob
Comment by Scott Messinger on February 17, 2011 at 11:45am

A agreed with only one thing in the article : "The deepest craving of human nature is the need to feel value and valuable"

Unfortunately, she went on with a vague list touchy-feely words that are supposed to help (acceptance, appreciation, approval, admiration and attention).  Where's the hard business-based stuff?  Training, resources, coaching, planning, goals, leadership?  These are the things that are lacking in a disengaged workforce.

 

 

 

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